hearing voices

Hearing Voices: “auditory hallucinations” or multidimensional communication?


Researchers in Ireland
have discovered that more than 20% of children ages 11-13 reported hearing voices.  The study showed that these “auditory hallucinations” stop as they get older and only 7% of older adolescents (aged 13-16) continue to hear voices. It does not appear that the study looked at younger children, who often retain the ability to remember past lives and “see” through the dimensional wall to their “imaginary” friends.

The study also reports that nearly 80% of the teenagers who did continue to hear voices also had a psychiatric disorder, although I couldn’t find details about this in any of the news reports.

The planet Uranus is associated with radical experiences of all kinds, but it also has a connection to multidimensional experiences.  Uranus rules electricity and electromagnetic energy, and our human energy grid is electromagnetic in nature.  I personally believe that human consciousness began to change in the late 1700s when Uranus was discovered, and that every major cycle involving the planet Uranus opens more energetic doorways of human awareness.  This was especially true during the conjunction of Uranus and Neptune in the early 1990s, and there is no doubt that children born since this time have been more sensitive and unique than any other generation before them.

I wrote about the “hearing voices” phenomenon back in 2010, quoting a New York Times article reporting that since the early 1990s (when Uranus conjoined Neptune) a growing number of researchers have been examining the phenomenon of voices in our heads.  That conjunction of Uranus and Neptune linked the electromagnetic expansion of Uranus with the transcendent experiences of Neptune, resulting in lots of self-delusion but also the growth of personal spirituality (as opposed to religion […]

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By |2012-04-14T07:19:56-04:00April 14th, 2012|Consciousness|6 Comments

Voices in our heads

While I am out of town I have selected some interesting articles to repost.

Nearly all of us hear voices of one kind or another. My mother hears the voice of her mother criticizing her in her head. Someone I know well hears music in his head – full orchestras. When I do readings, I hear voices describing aspects of the chart to me before I have a chance to notice them. Are we all crazy? Granted, this is nothing like the people whose voices urge them to murder and worse, but perhaps there’s more to this phenomenon than simply classifying people who hear voices as schizophrenics.

An article in the New York Times (thank you Ellie Crystal) asks the question, “Can you live with the voices in your head?” The article cites the work of a group in Britain called “Hearing Voices Network” whose purpose is to bring people that hear voices an opportunity to get together for mutual support. The Times article suggests:

Since the 1990s, a growing number of researchers and clinicians, predominantly based in England, have been comparing voice-hearing in psychotic patients with voice-hearing in nonpatients, measuring the incidence of hallucinations in the general population, and using cognitive behavioral therapy (C.B.T.), a popular, short-term treatment for depression and anxiety, to help them manage their responses to the voices they continue to hear. C.B.T. typically asks patients to scrutinize how they interpret their symptoms rather than focusing on an illness as an underlying cause. “The matter of whether it’s effective, and to what extent,” Lieberman says, is still being investigated. So far, the use of C.B.T. in the treatment of psychoses is much more prevalent in the […]

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By |2018-11-19T21:22:37-05:00May 29th, 2010|Life, Psychology|1 Comment

Voices in our heads

voicesNearly all of us hear voices of one kind or another. My mother hears the voice of her mother criticizing her in her head. Someone I know well hears music in his head – full orchestras. When I do readings, I hear voices describing aspects of the chart to me before I have a chance to notice them. Are we all crazy? Granted, this is nothing like the people whose voices urge them to murder and worse, but perhaps there’s more to this phenomenon than simply classifying people who hear voices as schizophrenics.

An article in the New York Times (thank you Ellie Crystal) asks the question, “Can you live with the voices in your head?” The article cites the work of a group in Britain called “Hearing Voices Network” whose purpose is to bring people that hear voices an opportunity to get together for mutual support. The Times article suggests:

Since the 1990s, a growing number of researchers and clinicians, predominantly based in England, have been comparing voice-hearing in psychotic patients with voice-hearing in nonpatients, measuring the incidence of hallucinations in the general population, and using cognitive behavioral therapy (C.B.T.), a popular, short-term treatment for depression and anxiety, to help them manage their responses to the voices they continue to hear. C.B.T. typically asks patients to scrutinize how they interpret their symptoms rather than focusing on an illness as an underlying cause. “The matter of whether it’s effective, and to what extent,” Lieberman says, is still being investigated. So far, the use of C.B.T. in the treatment of psychoses is much more prevalent in the U.K. than in the U.S.

I’m sure the powerful Big Pharma lobby has something to do with that.

But still, the whole concept […]

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By |2018-11-19T21:22:18-05:00March 27th, 2007|Consciousness, Favorite posts, Psychology|Comments Off on Voices in our heads
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