Neptune in Sagittarius and the astrology of the 1970s cults

RajneeshpuramI recently watched the Netflix documentary “Wild, Wild Country” about the town created by the followers of Baghwan Shree Rajneesh that began as a utopia of blissful cooperation and devolved into madness and unimaginably bizarre crimes of attempted murder and fraud.

The conjunction of Uranus (radical change) and Pluto (destruction of the old and transformation of the new) in the late 1960s took place in conservative Virgo, and the established morays of the previous decades were blown apart to smithereens.  Women began fighting for the right to be equal citizens.  People of color refused to sit in the back of the bus and demanded to sit at lunch counters and use any damn water fountain they pleased.

Religion was another arena that saw a radical transformation as the dogma of established religion was questioned and many began exploring other religions, including Eastern mysticism.  The acid experiments of the 1960s led to the spiritual seeking of the 1970s, symbolized most prominently by the conversion of Richard Alpert, colleague of Timothy Leary in the search for psychedelic enlightenment, who transformed into Ram Dass in 1971.

Neptune is the planet of spiritual experience and humanity’s search for an authentic connection with the divine.  Where Jupiter creates theologies and religious belief systems, Neptune says “forget all that nonsense and come directly to me.”  Neptune traveled through Scorpio between 1956 and 1969-1970 and inspired a desire to release sexuality from the shackles of marriage (Neptune in Libra) and eventually, in the 1960s, to experience sexuality as a pathway to bliss.  Neptune in Scorpio also generated a renewed interest in the occult, with the release of the Rider-Waite tarot deck to the general public in 1959.

Neptune moved into Sagittarius in 1970, bringing the Sagittarian interest in […]

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By |2018-03-29T11:17:21-04:00March 29th, 2018|Consciousness, Life|6 Comments

“The year that rock exploded”: Neptune in Sagittarius

1971I was just reading a review of a new book about 1971 as “the year that rock exploded” which says:

“In his new book, Never a Dull Moment,Hepworth makes the case that the music from 1971 was the result of “a huge explosion of creativity in a very short period of time” and lives on in the present like most old music does not.

Some of the best albums of all time were recorded and released in 1971, including:

  • “Sticky Fingers” by the Rolling Stone,
  • “The Yes Album” by Yes,
  • “Cry of Love” by Jimi Hendrix,
  • “Aqualung” by Jethro Tull,
  • “Imagine” by John Lennon,
  • “Inner Mounting Flame” by the Mahavishnu Orchestra,
  • “Pearl” by Janis Joplin,
  • “The Low Spark of High Heeled Boys” by Traffic,
  • “Led Zeppelin IV” by Led Zeppelin,
  • “Blue” by Joni Mitchell,
  • “Mud Slide Slim” by James Taylor,
  • “Tapestry” by Carole King.

You can read the whole list on the blog of David Hepworth who write the book.  As Hepworth points out, not only was an enormous amount of fantastic albums produced, the artists themselves kept pumping out brilliance into the world.

When there’s a big shift like this there is always a change in the astrological climate.  In December of 1970, Neptune entered the sign of Sagittarius.  Neptune is a tranformational planet: it inspires creativity and divine wisdom; it urges us to explore the realms beyond the ordinary and takes us to great heights.  By blurring our material vision it demands that we look within and outside of the material world. It can also cloud our vision, facilitate our addictions and generally create confusion, delusion and illusion.

Neptune is also associated with creativity and the arts as well as popular culture. With Neptune in Sagittarius, the sign of expansion and exploration, any boundaries or limits disappear and creativity abounds. […]

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By |2016-07-15T15:55:46-04:00July 15th, 2016|Planetary cycles|0 Comments
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