Richard Nolle

A few words about the May 5th Supermoon

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by Lynn Hayes  If you missed yesterday’s post on the Full Moon you can read it here. The May Full Moon occurs as the Moon is at what’s called perigee, its closest proximity to Earth.  When the Moon is near the Earth it appears larger than life, and astrologer Richard Nolle coined the term “Supermoon” because of the powerful impact the Supermoon often has on the earth.  As Richard explains it (and has done since 1979), the Supermoon occurs when the Sun, Moon and Earth are lined up in a particularly tight formation.  Richard has noted correspondences between the Supermoons (which occur at least four times a year) and earthquakes and tidal forces.

Examples of the SuperMoon connection with major storms and seismic events abound: the Mt. Pinatubo eruption, the largest volcanic event in the second half of the 20th Century, took place on June 15, 1991 (within three days of a SuperMoon); the October 6, 1948 Richter 7.3 earthquake that struck Ashgabat, Turkmenistan and took 110,000 lives, one of the deadliest earthquakes on record (again within three days of a SuperMoon, allowing for time zones); and the September 8, 1900 hurricane and tidal surge that struck Galveston, Texas on the day of a SuperMoon, which killed more people (8,000 dead) than any other Atlantic hurricane on record and remains the deadliest natural disaster yet to strike the United States. I’m just scratching the surface here, citing only a few historic instances in the past hundred years or so. Look a little deeper, and you’ll run across literally hundreds more greater and lesser seismic and meteorological disturbances, from Hurricane Andrew in 1992 to the 1989 […]

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By |2012-05-05T08:32:46-04:00May 5th, 2012|Moon|1 Comment

Will the Supermoon wreak more havoc on the world?

SupermoonAstrology is back in the mainstream news, with articles like this that have been circulating the internet lately:

The powerful tsunami that today slammed into Japan’s eastern coast comes just two days after warnings that the movement of the moon could trigger unpredictable events on Earth.

Astrologers predicted that on March 19 – a week tomorrow – the so-called ‘supermoon’ will be closer to Earth than at any time since 1992, just 221,567 miles away, and that its gravitational pull will bring chaos to Earth.

Others on the Internet have predicted it will cause further catastrophes such as volcanic eruptions and earthquakes.

I’ve written quite a few times on this blog about the “Supermoon” phenomenon, which can be traced back to astrologer Richard Nolle who coined the term.  A “Supermoon” is said to occur when the Full Moon is at perigee, meaning it is closer to the Earth than any other time.  Is the March 19 Supermoon that different from any other Full Moon at perigee?

Now that Richard is being bombarded with questions on this topic he’s put up a special page to clarify the mystery:

There are 4-6 SuperMoons a year. The one on March 19, 2011 is in fact the closest SuperMoon of the year, but it’s not by any means the first one in 18 years, nor even the first extreme SuperMoon in 18 years. The truth is, March 19 will be the second SuperMoon this year, and we only have to go back to January 30, 2010 to find the last example of an extreme SuperMoon; as revealed in my tables published in the last century. There was a SuperMoon in effect February 12-21 this year in fact, which anyone who actually read […]

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By |2011-03-14T07:11:43-04:00March 14th, 2011|Ecology|5 Comments
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