The astrological quandary of new planet discoveries

Image by Vivek Sonar Image by Vivek Sonar

Each time a new planet has been discovered, it has opened a new doorway in the field of astrology.  For thousands of years the visible planets told the entire astrological story, and life was considered to a march towards one inevitable destiny.  The planetary story of the natal chart was either exalted or debilitated, and one was forced to resign oneself to fate.

Beginning in the late 18th century with the discovery of Uranus, the astrological landscape began to change.  A flurry of revolutionary ideologies and a drive towards individuality, the hallmarks of the Uranian influence, spread like wildfire around the world.  Neptune’s discovery in the 19th century led to an increase of spiritual and mystical thought (as opposed to the religious dogma of the church state that was the primary governing force throughout the second millenium of the common era.  Pluto’s entry into the pantheon in 1930 opened the doorway for the great psychological teachers of our time (Freud and Jung) and oversaw the development of the atomic and hydrogen bombs that were later used annhilate a large part of Japan (Pluto rules the underworld of the psyche as well as the process of destruction and regeneration).

Between 1801 and 1804 the four commonly used asteroids (Ceres, Pallas, Juno, Vesta) were discovered, although they were not included in the astrological pantheon until the early 1970s.   Chiron’s discovery in late 1977 was an intriguing event for astrologers because of the difficulty in identifying whether Chiron was an asteroid, a comet, or a small planet (read more about that here) and for many years astrologers grouped Chiron together with the other asteroids although astronomers classified Chiron as one of the Centaur minor planets.

Beginning in […]

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By |2018-08-04T08:31:05-04:00October 18th, 2015|Astrology, Science|2 Comments

Astrology, the Kepler telescope, and extrasolar planets

The orbiting Kepler telescope has spotted a Jupiter-sized planet around another star — a sighting that demonstrates it can see Earth-like planets if they are out there, scientists reported on Thursday.

The planet, called HAT-P-7b, was already among the 300 or so known so-called extrasolar planets, the team led by the U.S. space agency NASA reported. But measurements of its orbit by Kepler show the telescope will be able to see smaller planets, they reported in the journal Science.

“Kepler is operating at the level required to detect Earth-size planets,” the team, led by William Borucki of the NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California, reported.

read more here...

In the conversation with Steven Forrest that I taped for last week’s radio show I asked him his thoughts on adding new planets to the astrological repertoire.  Steven’s philosophy is “as above, so below,” the principle on which astrologers usually rely in explaining how astrology works, applies to most things in the sky.  Asteroids, Chiron (a sort of permanent comet), other bodies in the Kuiper Belt, all of these planetary bodies belong to our solar system and have some astrological effect for humans on planet Earth.

It seems to me, though, that astrology was given to us as a tool to observe planets in OUR solar system.  Once we begin talking about planets outside of our solar system I would make the assumption that there would be no astrological effect on Earth.

Eris, Sedna, and Quaoar are all “trans-Neptunians,” meaning they are located past Neptune but still within our solar system.  I have just started incorporating Eris into client charts, and some astrologers are looking at Sedna and Quaoar.  There are quite a few other trans-Neptunian bodies that are used by […]

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By |2020-11-03T13:44:45-05:00August 5th, 2009|Astrology, Astronomy|Comments Off on Astrology, the Kepler telescope, and extrasolar planets
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