Supermoon astrology

First of three Supermoons: July 12 2014

Supermoon July 2014The first of the summer Supermoons will take place on July 12th.  The term Supermoon was coined by astrologer Richard Nolle to describe the Moon that when full (i.e., opposite the Sun) is at its perigee or closest point to the earth.

When a Supermoon occurs at a Full Moon the effect of the lunation is amplified.  Everyone responds differently to Full Moons.  Some become more emotional.  Some become more anxious.  Some (like me!) have trouble sleeping.  Some have no experience of a Full Moon at all.

Much of your experience of Full Moons generally depends on the makeup of your astrological chart, but also whether the lunation makes a mathematical relationship to your own chart.  For example, if you have a challenging planetary system in your chart at 20 degrees Capricorn, a Full Moon at 20 degrees Capricorn or thereabouts will affect you more personally.

The Capricorn Full Moon brings a fascination with the material world – how will we master our finances?  What is our role in the world around us?  How can we feel fulfilled in our chosen profession and vocation?  How do we resolve the tension between our inner and home (Cancer) with the need to make a mark in the world? (Capricorn).

Richard Nolle has connected the Supermoon with an increase in geophysical activity such as earthquakes, floods, and even solar flares.  He is nearly always correct!

What makes this particular Supermoon even more dramatic is the fact that the lunation makes a nearly exact square to the lunar nodes.  A lunation is called an eclipse when the Sun and Moon are conjunct the lunar nodes – the square aspect is more intense and creates more drama for the Moon.  Heightened emotional intensity will be the […]

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By |2016-11-15T08:28:49-05:00July 10th, 2014|Moon|11 Comments

A few words about the May 5th Supermoon

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by Lynn Hayes  If you missed yesterday’s post on the Full Moon you can read it here. The May Full Moon occurs as the Moon is at what’s called perigee, its closest proximity to Earth.  When the Moon is near the Earth it appears larger than life, and astrologer Richard Nolle coined the term “Supermoon” because of the powerful impact the Supermoon often has on the earth.  As Richard explains it (and has done since 1979), the Supermoon occurs when the Sun, Moon and Earth are lined up in a particularly tight formation.  Richard has noted correspondences between the Supermoons (which occur at least four times a year) and earthquakes and tidal forces.

Examples of the SuperMoon connection with major storms and seismic events abound: the Mt. Pinatubo eruption, the largest volcanic event in the second half of the 20th Century, took place on June 15, 1991 (within three days of a SuperMoon); the October 6, 1948 Richter 7.3 earthquake that struck Ashgabat, Turkmenistan and took 110,000 lives, one of the deadliest earthquakes on record (again within three days of a SuperMoon, allowing for time zones); and the September 8, 1900 hurricane and tidal surge that struck Galveston, Texas on the day of a SuperMoon, which killed more people (8,000 dead) than any other Atlantic hurricane on record and remains the deadliest natural disaster yet to strike the United States. I’m just scratching the surface here, citing only a few historic instances in the past hundred years or so. Look a little deeper, and you’ll run across literally hundreds more greater and lesser seismic and meteorological disturbances, from Hurricane Andrew in 1992 to the 1989 […]

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By |2012-05-05T08:32:46-04:00May 5th, 2012|Moon|1 Comment
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