Sunday Saturn inspiration: “Routine is freedom from time”

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“Routine is not a prison, but the way to freedom from time.  The apparently measured time has immeasurable space within it, and in this it resembles music.”

― May Sarton

I’m afraid I have still been a bit in the Underworld after a very trying twelve months, but a bit more rest and rejuvenation and I will be back in full swing.  The Planetary Illuminations report had to go on hiatus in October but will be back in November.

Saturn is preparing to square my Moon, and as the Prince of Solitude and Structure (Saturn) applies more and more pressure to my emotions and security issues (Moon) I decided it was a good time for some Visioncrafting of my own.  As I made my lists of the things I want to bring into my life in the seven categories of human experience the thing that kept emerging was scheduling time and honoring a routine for the things that bring richness to my inner self: yoga, meditation, walks in the woods…

As a busy business person I am no stranger to calendars and schedules, but when it comes to enriching my inner life I tend to resist conforming my inner world into the rigid world of time.  Saturn sits right on my Sun and is always reminding me, as he so often does, that time is passing quickly.  So in the spiritual side of my life I often long for the space and freedom of spontaneity and the absence of regulation.

I took a break during my Visioncrafting to look for today’s inspiration post, and the first thing to catch my eye was this quote from May Sarton.  Suddenly my […]

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By |2021-05-22T14:57:20-04:00October 27th, 2013|Astrology in my world, Inspiration|3 Comments

The Battle Against Time

perpetual-calendarInteresting article on a new book called Rhythms of Life: The Biological Clocks that Control the Daily Lives of Every Living Thing:

Man has invented many ways to measure physical time, from ancient sundials to water and sand clocks, from the pendulum to the wind-up pocket watch, all the way to the modern atomic clock. An example of this latter-day timekeeper, introduced in 1950, measures a second as 9,192,631,770 cycles in the energy radiation of the Caesium atom. This produces an atomic second, which is one-86, 000th of a solar day, and is accurate to one second in three million years. Not bad, if you care about promptness. Whether time is real or not (as philosophers continue to ponder), whether without our constructions it really does “flow,” what unites all clocks is that they measure a well-defined, regular, and uniform physical change of one kind or another.

In their wonderful book, Russell G. Foster and Leon Kreitzman tell us that while our ability to measure time has improved over the ages, we have nevertheless “been steadily losing a battle with time. Instead of controlling our modern clocks, they control us.” Think about it: when we want to know when it is time to eat, or to go to bed, or to plan a vacation, we look at watches and clocks and calendars. Increasingly, these tools become dictators. But consider nature for a moment: without a Rolex or even a Swatch, the monarch butterfly knows to migrate from North America to Central America at precisely the same time each year. With no calendar and no alarm clock, the cicada emerges from the ground after exactly thirteen or seventeen years for a few fleeting weeks of frenzied mating–and […]

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By |2020-11-03T13:28:11-05:00December 15th, 2008|Life|Comments Off on The Battle Against Time

New dimensions of space and time

Fractal art by Alice WebbFractal art by Alice Webb

Just in time for the square of Jupiter to Uranus, and proving once again that scientists don’t know everything, here is  an article on a new theory of six dimensions in physical reality rather than just four:

Time is no longer a simple line from the past to the future, in a four dimensional world consisting of three dimensions of space and one of time. Instead, the physicist envisages the passage of history as curves embedded in a six dimensions, with four of space and two of time.

“There isn’t just one dimension of time,” Itzhak Bars of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles tells New Scientist. “There are two. One whole dimension of time and another of space have until now gone entirely unnoticed by us.”

Bars claims his theory of “two time physics”, which he has developed over more than a decade, can help solve problems with current theories of the cosmos and, crucially, has true predictive power that can be tested in a forthcoming particle physics experiment.

If it is confirmed, it could point the way to a “theory of everything” that unites all the physical laws of the universe into one, notably general relativity that governs gravity and the large scale structure of the universe, and quantum theory that rules the subatomic world.

In the quest for that all embracing theory, scientists have been adding extra dimensions of space to their equations for decades. As early as the 1920s, mathematicians found that moving up to four dimensions of space, instead of the three we experience, helped in their quest to reconcile theories of electromagnetism and gravity.

entire article here…

The concept that time moves backwards as well […]

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By |2007-10-11T09:16:46-04:00October 11th, 2007|Science|0 Comments
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