Wesak

Passion and adjustment: Scorpio Full Moon May 7, 2020

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At any Full Moon we are dealing with two opposite signs with opposing polarities, each one needing what the other one possesses in order to become truly whole.  This can serve to bring out our inner contradictions, and heighten the intense emotionality for which the Full Moon is well known.  The Scorpio Full Moon features an opposition to the Taurus Sun: the intensity and passion of Scorpio needs to find balance against the need for serenity and peacefulness of Taurus.  Both are fixed signs: stubborn and powerful, with a tendency towards rigidity and difficulty letting go.  Scorpio, though, is intensely emotional and dramatic where Taurus is, or at least wants to be, placid but still powerful – very like the bull for which it is named.

This Full Moon reminds us that we can become our best selves when we find balance between these two dynamics:  the power of emotions and the power of stillness.  The potency of this time is echoed in the fact that the astrological Beltane, a fire festival honoring the god Belenos (the shining one), occurs at the midway point between the vernal equinox and the summer solstice, at 15 degrees Taurus.  The Vesak festival honoring not only the birth of Buddha, but also his enlightenment and death,  is a festival of lights which takes place each year at the Scorpio Full Moon.  Scorpio is ruled for its passionate potency, and the Scorpio Full Moon has the potential to create a powerful force of Will which can be used to create and manifest.  The Scorpio Full Moon calls on us to explore the deep realms of the unconscious and our own passionate natures and come to terms with our own inner […]

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By |2020-05-05T08:41:44-04:00May 5th, 2020|Moon|10 Comments

Happy Beltane and Wesak 2010

A portion of this article is reposted from previous work

(A portion of this article is reprinted from an earlier post)

In ancient Celtic times, the wheel of the year was honored as the turning of the seasons. In the northern hemispheres, the winter solstice was the shortest day of the year and represented the return of the light, and the summer solstice, being the longest day of the year, was the Celtic fire festival. The equinoxes represented the points of balance when day and night were of equal length: the vernal equinox represented planting and fertility, and the autumnal equinox was the time of harvest. (Southern hemisphere civilizations had their own traditions of marking the seasons which obviously were very different than in the north.)

Halfway between these solar events are the “cross-quarter” days, the times of magic. Still celebrated today for their imaginal power, these were the periods when the Sun was at the midpoint of the fixed signs: Taurus, Scorpio, Leo and Aquarius. In the astrological wheel, the cardinal signs of initiation are followed by the fixed signs of stability, which are followed in turn by the mutable signs of adaptation. So we have cardinal Aries at the Vernal equinox (in tropical astrology), followed by fixed Taurus at the cross-quarter, which precedes mutable Gemini. Cancer begins the summer solstice, followed by Leo at the cross-quarter, which precedes Virgo, and so it goes around the wheel.

Each of these “triplicities” as they are called has a different energy. The cardinal signs demonstrate leadership, they initiate action, each in its own way according to its element (fire, water, earth and air). The fixed signs are stable, rooted, grounded. In many ways they are the most powerful because they don’t […]

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By |2010-04-30T11:33:40-04:00April 30th, 2010|Life, Moon|2 Comments
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